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Now that the 2020 election has concluded, there has been no shortage of commentary on how things played out: It was good for Republicans and bad for Democrats. The Grand Old Party (GOP) has become thoroughly Trumpified. The majority of Democratic voters rejected progressive policies. There was voter fraud in liberal districts. There was voter fraud in conservative districts. Trump voters are delusional. The pollsters are pathetically inept. White women still supported Trump more than the polls let on. Latino voters are more conservative than they are given credit for. More and more Black voters are rejecting the Democratic party and its policies. The election results are a warning for the Democratic party. President Trump has still not conceded and probably has something up his sleeve. …


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We have finally reached election eve 2020. Given this fact, numerous pundits, politicians, columnists, plain janes and average joes are all weighing in with their analysis. Throughout the election season. Joe Biden and the Democrats have emphasized pluralism and diversity of all stripes — age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, etc. Earlier this summer, California senator Kamala Harris made history by being the first woman of color to accept a nomination for vice president of the United States of America (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNaWPhzCcoo).

The message Biden and his fellow Democrats have sent to the country is that the America that he and Kamala Harris will preside over would be one of fairness and inclusion, where people from all walks of life would be welcomed, embraced, and treated with dignity and respect. Donald Trump and the Republicans have presided over an administration that has relied upon racism, imperialism, nationalism, virtue signaling, xenophobia, tribalism, embracing authoritarianism and a deliriously dangerous dose of fear and paranoia. …


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We have finally reached election eve 2020. Given this fact, numerous pundits, politicians, columnists, plain janes, and average joes are all weighing in with their analysis. Throughout the election season. Joe Biden and the Democrats have emphasized pluralism and diversity of all stripes — age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, etc. Earlier this summer, California senator Kamala Harris made history by being the first woman of color to accept a nomination for vice president of the United States of America (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNaWPhzCcoo).

The message Biden and his fellow Democrats have sent to the country is that the America that he and Kamala Harris will preside over would be one of fairness and inclusion, where people from all walks of life would be welcomed, embraced, and treated with dignity and respect. Donald Trump and the Republicans have presided over an administration that has relied upon racism, imperialism, nationalism, virtue signaling, xenophobia, tribalism, embracing authoritarianism and a deliriously dangerous dose of fear and paranoia. …


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Image of book cover courtesy of author and The University of Chicago Press

The following book review was written by omariscottsimmons, Director of Business Law, Wake Forest University School of Law, and is reposted here with permission…

How did we get here? Racial unrest across the country, a new virus crippling the nation’s health, an anemic economy, and extreme political divisions are shaking our democratic foundations.

Elwood Watson’s, Keepin’ It Real: Essays on Race in Contemporary America, helps to answer this vexing question. Written before the death of George Floyd, and the COVID-19 global pandemic, it is prescient and illustrates how we got to this moment of inflection and social strife.

This brilliantly written, intellectually honest essay collection examines the complex manifestations of race in the contemporary context.

Keepin’ It Real: Essays on Race in Contemporary America by Elwood David Watson (The University of Chicago…


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Photo by Maria Oswalt on Unsplash

Yesterday’s deleterious decision in the Breonna Taylor case was vexing, to say the least.

A grand jury empaneled in Kentucky failed to indict any of the involved white male police officers for murder of the late EMT — an essential worker amid the pandemic — via dozens of shots fired inside her Southside Louisville apartment.

As you know by now, the murder of 26-year-old Breonna Talyor occurred after plain clothes policemen shockingly busted into her home during the early morning hours, as she and her boyfriend were sleeping.

The failure by the grand jury to effectuate justice leaves the Black community in Kentucky and nationwide reeling with the hopeless feeling that Taylor was effectively murdered twice: first, by trigger happy and reckless white policemen; and second, by a blatantly racist judicial system that treats African Americans as second class citizens. …


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Photo by Analise Benevides on Unsplash

Over the past several months, there have been numerous discussions surrounding the issue of race in America and COVID-19. Both topics have been at the forefront of public discourse.

Notably, despite all the attention given to online teaching, potential teaching loads, budget restrictions, free speech and the issue of race itself (as it relates to higher education), not as much discussion has been devoted to the impact of ethnic studies programs within the current academic environment.

The perennial issues that routinely plague such units, such as reluctant institutional commitment, chronic lack of funding, resistant and apprehensive students, and perceptions of unhinged radicalism among the faculty and students involved in the discipline, are undeniable. …


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Now that both political parties have concluded their conventions, pundits, politicians, columnists, plain janes, and average joes are all weighing in with their analyses. Joe Biden and the Democrats emphasized pluralism and diversity of all stripes — age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, etc. California senator Kamala Harris made history by being the first woman of color to accept her party’s nomination for Vice President of the United States of America (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNaWPhzCcoo). …


This past weekend, Bill Maher, host of the quasi political/entertainment program HBO Real Time with Bill Maher had renowned Black intellectual and ordained Baptist minister Dr. Michael Eric Dyson and rapper Ice Cube as guests.They discussed the controversy that erupted on the May 31 edition of the program when Maher flippantly referred to himself as a “house nigger” in an interview with Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.).

The senator had been invited to the program to discuss his book on what he sees as the increasing problem on prolonged adolescence occurring in American society. Sasse and Maher agreed on the issue and provided examples and suggestions on how to rectify the problem. …


Congressman John Lewis stands with arms-folded and wearing a coronavirus mask at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, DC.
Congressman John Lewis stands with arms-folded and wearing a coronavirus mask at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, DC.
John Lewis visits Black Lives Matter Plaza near the White House. Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

As America collectively mourns the death of beloved Congressman John R. Lewis, I cannot easily forgive or forget the blatant disrespect shown to the civil rights icon by racist-in-chief Donald Trump.

The most recent slap down occurred when Trump tweeted a perfunctory and woefully hollow statement on the passing of Rep. Lewis.

One would expect any U.S. president to rise to the occasion with dignity by offering praise and appreciation for all Lewis had accomplished for his country in effectuating civil rights and racial justice for the greater good.

But that was too much to ask of a serial liar and raging narcissist like Trump, who doesn’t hide his utter contempt for minorities and women on one hand, while basking in his retrograde affinity for the white supremacy of the Confederacy on the other. …


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As he’s laid to rest later next week, there will be no shortage of salutes to Congressman John Lewis, the formidable civil rights activist and legislator from Georgia who departed this earth on July 17, 2020, at the age of 80.

Mr. Lewis was a larger than life figure, a fierce, fiery presence packaged in a medium-sized man’s body. He was a person who lived an extraordinary life.

Mr. Lewis, there have already been numerous, bountiful tributes to you; you were more than deserving of such recognition.

The commentary (save for a few right-wing websites) has been overwhelmingly positive and rightly so. Indeed, even when you were alive, there were a considerable number of articles written about you and your life experiences. …

About

Elwood Watson, Ph.D.

Historian, public speaker, social-cultural critic. Professor of African American and Gender Studies, Post-WWII U.S. History, at East Tennessee State University.

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